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Are Processed Foods Really That Bad?

Are Processed Foods Really That Bad?

Are your meals all from a container or have a paper wrapper around them? Maybe you’re eating too many processed foods if that’s true. Labeling all processed food as bad is a generalization and not exactly correct. If you wash fruits and vegetables, they’re processed. Cooking them also makes them processed. That doesn’t mean they’re unhealthy. In fact, frozen fruits and vegetables, which are processed, may be healthier than fresh ones you buy off the grocery shelf. If they’re allowed to ripen on the vine and then frozen at a nearby processing center, they’re fresher and filled with more nutrients that freezing doesn’t destroy.

It’s about reading the label and knowing what the food contains.

If you read the label of a jar of peanut butter and it says, “peanuts” and nothing else, it’s a healthy option. Most peanut butter doesn’t. It may contain preservatives and ingredients to keep the oil from separating. Many have added sugar and salt. Look for foods with the fewest ingredients and avoid those that contain sugar or one of the many names for sugar such as fructose, high fructose corn syrup and dextrose.

Save money and time by choosing carefully.

Some canned foods are almost as healthy as fresh and far lowering in price during the off-season. If you buy items like green beans and note it has added salt or sugar, rinse the beans before cooking to lower the sodium content. You can use canned beans in salads or choose water packed tuna as a more inexpensive alternative to fresh tuna.

Check for whole grains and foods without added sugar or chemicals.

If you read the labels on the food and find words you can’t pronounce or feel like you’re back in chemistry class, put down the food and walk away. Healthy food has few added ingredients. It can be processed and healthy. Whole grain breads are healthier than bread with white, bleached refined grain flour, even though it is processed and has several ingredients. Use your common sense when choosing food, steering clear of sugary treats and those made with refined grains.

  • Make a sweet treat that’s healthy with frozen cherries chopped up for a parfait. A layer of Greek yogurt, layer of chopped cherries, a half banana chopped, topped with more Greek yogurt and nuts is a great dessert your family will love that can cure your cravings for sweets.
  • Don’t just read the advertisement on the front of the package to determine whether it’s healthy. Some products tout they are gluten-free, which doesn’t automatically mean it’s healthy. Check ingredients before you buy.
  • Good options for canned foods can include tomatoes, spinach, green beans, kidney beans, lentils, pumpkin and artichokes. If you look for canned fruit, make sure it’s packed in its own juice with no sugar added.
  • Processed meats and snack foods are often the biggest offenders, but you have to watch what you drink as well. Skip soft drinks and even fruit drinks and opt for water instead. Avoid fat free products, since sugar is often added to make it palatable.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


DASH Diet For High Blood Pressure

DASH Diet For High Blood Pressure

You’ll find people of all ages that come to Revolution Training in Stamford, CT. Each of them have a very personal goal. Some just want to get healthier or lower their high blood pressure. Those individuals often combine the exercise program with a DASH diet. What is a DASH diet? DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. It’s not really a diet but a lifestyle change. The training at Revolution Training, combined with the DASH way of eating can bring blood pressure back to normal without medication. The National Institutes of Health sponsored the research.

The DASH diet lowers your sodium intake.

Not only will you lower your sodium intake, foods higher in magnesium, potassium and calcium are often increased when people eat the DASH diet. After comparing it with other types of diets, it was found that it lowered the systolic blood pressure—the top number—as much as 14 points. That can be significant for some people. It’s a healthier way of eating that focuses on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low fat milk, poultry, fish, nuts and beans. The DASH diet also suggests lowering foods high in sodium, drinks with added sugar—such as soft drinks—and red meat. It limits saturated and trans fats, too.

The DASH diet wasn’t created to lose weight, but you might lose weight on it.

If you start a program of regular exercise and stick with the DASH diet, you potentially will lose weight. It’s really not very restrictive and allows 6 to 8 servings of cereals and grains each day focusing on whole grain. You can consume 4 to 5 servings of vegetables. Eating too many vegetables is never a problem, so if you eat more than 5 servings, don’t worry. You also get to consume 4 to 5 servings of fruit every day, 2 to 3 servings of dairy and up to 6 one-ounce servings of poultry, fish and lean meat. One egg is one serving. You can have up to 4 or 5 servings of nuts, seeds and legumes each week, 5 servings of sweets each week and 2 to 3 servings of fats and oils a day.

Does the DASH diet work?

There’s little evidence that lowering your salt intake actually lowers blood pressure, unless your salt intake was excessively high or were found to be salt sensitive. What the diet does do is make you more aware of what you’re eating, cut out many processed foods and increase many people’s intake of fruits and vegetables. Cutting out products with added sugar, refined grains, processed meats and soft drinks can go a long way in lowering blood pressure, while providing other health benefits, such as reducing the risk of diabetes and gout.

  • There’s more research showing that a diet that was lower in added sugar could lower blood pressure. A study of 43 obese children with high blood pressure had a diet far lower in sugar. Their blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels dropped significantly in just nine days.
  • Whether you choose the DASH diet or any other whole foods diet, changing your lifestyle and becoming more active can improve your results dramatically. It makes your heart stronger and more efficient.
  • Exercise is also important for lowering blood pressure, because it helps you lose weight. It also helps burn off the hormones of stress that can increase your blood pressure and increases nitric oxide in your blood, which reduces the resistance in blood vessels.
  • Not only will you get the exercise you need to stay healthier at Revolution Training, you’ll find a family of support and have fun as you get fitter. You’ll develop more confidence and learn self-defense skills.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


DASH Diet For High Blood Pressure

You’ll find people of all ages that come to Revolution Training in Stamford, CT. Each of them have a very personal goal. Some just want to get healthier or lower their high blood pressure. Those individuals often combine the exercise program with a DASH diet. What is a DASH diet? DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. It’s not really a diet but a lifestyle change. The training at Revolution Training, combined with the DASH way of eating can bring blood pressure back to normal without medication. The National Institutes of Health sponsored the research.

The DASH diet lowers your sodium intake.

Not only will you lower your sodium intake, foods higher in magnesium, potassium and calcium are often increased when people eat the DASH diet. After comparing it with other types of diets, it was found that it lowered the systolic blood pressure—the top number—as much as 14 points. That can be significant for some people. It’s a healthier way of eating that focuses on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low fat milk, poultry, fish, nuts and beans. The DASH diet also suggests lowering foods high in sodium, drinks with added sugar—such as soft drinks—and red meat. It limits saturated and trans fats, too.

The DASH diet wasn’t created to lose weight, but you might lose weight on it.

If you start a program of regular exercise and stick with the DASH diet, you potentially will lose weight. It’s really not very restrictive and allows 6 to 8 servings of cereals and grains each day focusing on whole grain. You can consume 4 to 5 servings of vegetables. Eating too many vegetables is never a problem, so if you eat more than 5 servings, don’t worry. You also get to consume 4 to 5 servings of fruit every day, 2 to 3 servings of dairy and up to 6 one-ounce servings of poultry, fish and lean meat. One egg is one serving. You can have up to 4 or 5 servings of nuts, seeds and legumes each week, 5 servings of sweets each week and 2 to 3 servings of fats and oils a day.

Does the DASH diet work?

There’s little evidence that lowering your salt intake actually lowers blood pressure, unless your salt intake was excessively high or were found to be salt sensitive. What the diet does do is make you more aware of what you’re eating, cut out many processed foods and increase many people’s intake of fruits and vegetables. Cutting out products with added sugar, refined grains, processed meats and soft drinks can go a long way in lowering blood pressure, while providing other health benefits, such as reducing the risk of diabetes and gout.

There’s more research showing that a diet that was lower in added sugar could lower blood pressure. A study of 43 obese children with high blood pressure had a diet far lower in sugar. Their blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels dropped significantly in just nine days.

Whether you choose the DASH diet or any other whole foods diet, changing your lifestyle and becoming more active can improve your results dramatically. It makes your heart stronger and more efficient.

Exercise is also important for lowering blood pressure, because it helps you lose weight. It also helps burn off the hormones of stress that can increase your blood pressure and increases nitric oxide in your blood, which reduces the resistance in blood vessels.

Not only will you get the exercise you need to stay healthier at Revolution Training, you’ll find a family of support and have fun as you get fitter. You’ll develop more confidence and learn self-defense skills.


Active Stretching Vs Static Stretching

Active Stretching Vs Static Stretching

We focus on safety and form at Revolution Training in Stamford, CT, and part of that focus includes ensuring clients warm up and cool down when they workout. We use all types of stretching, active stretching, passive stretching, dynamic stretching and static stretching. Active stretching is the opposite of passive stretching. When you do passive stretching, you apply force to stretch the muscle, like grabbing your ankle and pulling for a bent knee quad stretch. Active stretching is doing the movement to stretch, hands over your head stretch and bend down to touch your toes.

Dynamic stretching is different than static stretching.

Unlike passive and active, which indicates where the force of the stretch emanated, dynamic and static stretching have to do with swhether you stretch and hold or move. Dynamic stretching moves the muscles through the full range of motion, only briefly stopping in any one position. Alternating lunges are the perfect example of dynamic stretches.

What is static stretching?

Static stretching doesn’t involve much movement. It’s the act of holding a muscle in a stretched mode for several seconds. The maximum stretch is usually 30 seconds, since there’s no scientific evidence that longer is beneficial. You do static stretching after a workout. It slightly tugs on the muscles and helps that muscle relax after a workout. Since the muscles are already warmed up and flexible, by doing static stretching afterward, you can improve your range of motion.

You do active stretching in the gym and it can be dynamic or static.

Passive stretch can be done alone, but most of the time it’s done during physical therapy or during a massage. Its biggest benefit is that it can stretch muscles beyond the flexibility they already have to increase range of motion, such as during therapy. It tends to be more painful than active stretching, so being relaxed is important. That’s why using it post workout is important to prevent stretching and potentially injuring a cold muscle. Most athletes use active stretching.

  • The classifications normally used when discussing pre and post stretching—warming up and cooling down—focus on static vs dynamic stretching.
  • Dynamic stretching activates the muscles and warms them up for a specific activity. It targets specific muscle groups by mimicking the activity of the movement. It increases blood flow, flexibility and muscle temperature, while reducing resistance.
  • Static stretching can be used to help muscles relax, or be the perfect way to end a workout. The muscles are warmed so stretching can increase the range of motion when stretched and reduce or prevent post-workout stiffness.
  • If you’re doing dynamic stretching, such as walking lunges, don’t bounce or force the stretch. It creates an uncontrolled motion, forcing the muscle to a greater range of motion and that can cause injury.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Good Foods To Refuel Yourself After A Workout

Good Foods To Refuel Yourself After A Workout

Some people opt for commercially made post workout foods to refuel after a workout. They’re not what we normally recommend, but do have all the nutrients necessary to get your body going and help speed recovery. Best of all, these types of products are easy to use and extremely portable. Whether you opt for a made-at-home post workout food or one you purchased that’s ready-made, it’s important to have the right combination to aid in building muscle tissue, boost your immune functioning, reduce muscle soreness, improve bone mass and help the body burn excess body fat.

What are the commercial options?

Post workout commercial options include food with whey protein supplements. It may just be whey powder that you add to fruit juice to make the right combination of carbs and protein or a vegetarian option of protein powder made from soy, peas, rice, hemp or peanuts. If you want a vegetarian option that has all nine essential amino acids, choose soy. You can also get that by combining pea and rice protein powder.

I prefer choosing whole foods rather than using protein powder and juice.

There are several reasons you might need to use protein powder or the many protein post workout snacks, most of the time they’re used because they’re easy. I prefer taking the time to make a snack at home and bringing it to the gym. Hard boiled eggs and crackers travel well and are easy to prepare. There are now individual size packets of tuna, which also can be served on crackers or toast for a protein/carb combination that will help recovery.

If you have a thermal container or can eat your post workout snack within 45 minutes, there are far more options.

Cottage cheese or Greek yogurt with a mix of fresh berries, cherries or chopped up other type of fruit and maybe a sprinkling of nuts is a tasty way to refuel your body after a workout. Even unsweetened applesauce mixed with cottage cheese can be delicious, refreshing and good for a post-workout snack. If you like hummus, try pita bread and hummus to provide both the protein and carbs you require. If you have a blender, the world is your oyster when it comes to making post workout snacks. You can fill the blender with fruit and the recommended amount of protein powder or a cup of Greek yogurt, which is higher in protein than regular yogurt.

  • While you need to eat a snack within the first 45 minutes, doing it soon as possible is important after a hard workout. Don’t forget to hydrate, either. In fact, hydration is more important than the actual snack.
  • One of my favorite snacks is a sliced apple with peanut butter topping. Make sure the peanut butter only contains one ingredient—peanuts. There are several popular brands from which to choose and most are labeled “natural.”
  • The harder you workout, the more important eating protein and carbs after your workout becomes. If you’re going to do intense weight training, make sure you also plan your snack or plan to eat a full meal afterward.
  • A veggie omelet that includes onions, mushrooms, sweet red pepper, broccoli and other veggies, topped with cheese and served with a side of roasted vegetables, which includes potatoes and a side of avocado slices and whole wheat toast is a good post-workout meal.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Workouts For Toned Arms

Workouts For Toned Arms

With the weather warming, everyone is starting to think about those batwings and flabby arms that have been in hiding under layers of clothing all winter. If you’re one of our boxing students, you probably don’t need workouts for toned arms, because boxing naturally tones the arms. However, for everyone else, these workouts can change flab into toned muscle quickly. If you’ve recently lost a lot of weight, it may take a little time for the skin to tighten.

It’s easier for younger people to get rid of batwings, but still possible no matter what your age.

Strength training is the key to toning arms, but so is throwing a punch. You use your shoulders and arms, putting forth a lot of effort every time you spar or train. You can build muscle suing dumbbells. For the forearms, do palm-up and palm-down wrist curls with bicep curls for the biceps. Overhead extensions and tricep kickbacks are good for the back of the upper arm.

Bodyweight exercises can boost your strength, while they tone the arms.

There’s no doubt about it, sometimes old school is the absolute best for getting into shape. For the upper arms, you can use push-ups and modify your hand position to affect different areas. If you’re not yet ready for a traditional push-up and need to build strength first, start with a modified one on bent knees. The area of the arm the push-up works will vary by the placement of your hands. Placing hands closer together, directly under the chest to form a triangle will help eliminate bat wings. Traditional push-ups with hands shoulder width work the triceps also and the small muscle in the front of the arm, the coracobrachialis. Holding your hands wider than your shoulders will work the shoulders and triceps in a different way.

Use furniture or the bench in the gym for bench dips.

You can workout your arms anywhere, even in the office, if you have a sturdy chair that doesn’t roll or a strong coffee table. Bench dips, normally done in the gym are versatile. Sit on the edge of your chair or table with legs extended and slowly lower yourself to the floor, holding the side of the chair or front of the table. Lower your body until your arms are bent at a 90 degree angle, then lift your body back to seated position. It’s a great workout for the arms.

  • A bent over row uses dumbbells. Hold one in each hand and bend at the waist, pushing shoulder blades together and back flat. Your arms should be straight down with palms facing. Pull the dumbbells up to your chest and then lower them back to start position.
  • Keep it simple with a plank. Just hold your body in plank position for as long as you can. It’s so simple and quick, you can do it at home during television commercials.
  • Being your best and getting your best results also requires good nutrition. Besides building muscle tissue, eating food that has plenty of collagen and protein can improve the elasticity of the skin.
  • Whether you come for personal training or boxing, at Revolution Training, we’ll work on toning your upper arms, whether you’re using personal training or boxing. We can have you short sleeve ready in no time.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Should I Get Rid Of White Flour In My Diet?

Should I Get Rid Of White Flour In My Diet?

At Revolution Training in Stamford, CT, we value our clients and often think of them as family. That’s why we spend a lot of time answering fitness questions that go beyond the workouts and exercise programs. Diet is such an important part of fitness, and we often get questions on the best foods to eat and what not to eat. One of the most frequently asked questions is about what to eliminate from diets to lose weight and be healthier. In fact, many clients ask whether they have to get rid of white flour to shed those extra pounds and perform the best in the gym. The answer is yes, white flour and products made from white flour aren’t the healthiest options to eat.

White flour is ultra processed and all the good nutrients are removed.

Grain contains three parts: the bran, endosperm and germ. The bran is the hard outer layer. It’s a good source of fiber, antioxidants and B vitamins. The inner section of the seed is the germ. It’s also a good source of B vitamins, plus minerals, fat and protein. The middle is the endosperm that feeds the plant. It’s starchy and mostly carbohydrates. Refining the flour removes the most nutritious parts, the bran and the germ, leaving only the starchy part. The flour goes through a number of processes, like bleaching. Even though companies add nutrients and call the flour enriched, many of the added nutrients aren’t bioavailable to our body.

The type of food that uses white flour aren’t normally healthy options.

Think about the type of food you normally find containing white flour. The first to come to mind is bread, but other options are cakes, cookies, donuts, pasta, crackers, pizza crust, pie crust and cereals. Most of these would be considered junk food, not just because of the white flour, but also because of the additives like preservatives, sugar, salt and unhealthy oil. They’re high in calories and low in nutrition, making them a horrible option for weight loss.

White flour not only can lead to obesity, but also to insulin resistance and diabetes.

White flour products can pack on the pounds, without providing any benefits. They have a high glycemic index, which means blood sugar levels increase rapidly after consumption. The fiber is removed, so there’s nothing to slow the absorption. Studies show that switching from white flour to whole grains dramatically reduces the risk for diabetes, insulin resistance, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  • Inflammation is a leading cause of a variety of diseases. In fact, inflammation is linked to diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease. White flour is linked to increased levels of inflammatory markers in the blood.
  • You’ll improve your digestive tract with the fiber when you switch from white flour to whole grain. Since the fiber is removed from white flour, it can impact the healthy microbes in your gut that aid in many functions of the body.
  • Products made with white flour don’t contain fiber, so you won’t feel full as quickly or for as long. Fiber is filling and can keep you satisfied longer, since it does slow digestion. You’ll eat less and lose weight easier.
  • If you are gluten intolerant or have Crohn’s disease, white flour will make you sick, but so will whole grain. You can opt for flour made from wild rice, coconut, almonds, brown rice, buckwheat, sorghum, teff, quinoa, amaranth or oats to avoid that.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Best Foods For Your Heart

Best Foods For Your Heart

At Revolution Training in Stamford, CT, we emphasize exercise to help get you into shape, but also include nutritional information. If you don’t have the proper building blocks of material, no matter how often you workout or how hard, you won’t get fitter. Many of our clients come for training to help improve serious conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease. For these conditions, diet is extremely important. While eating healthy is good for both condition, there are specific diets can help improve your condition. Foods for your heart are high in Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, CoQ10, magnesium and potassium. Shedding extra weight can also help a heart condition.

Get vitamin D for overall good health, including heart health.

For too long, people cherished a deep tan and spent days in the sun, slathering on baby oil to make the effect more intense. Only later did they find it opened the doorway to potential skin cancer and early aging of the skin. Now we’re on the other spectrum, where sunscreen is in every product and people don’t get enough sun. The body changes the rays of the sun into vitamin D. There are studies that show a vast majority of Americans have a vitamin D shortage. While it’s harder to get vitamin D from food, you can eat egg yolks, cheese, beef liver and vitamin D fortified products to boost your intake.

Eat more omega-3 fatty acids and fewer omega-6 fatty acids.

You do need both, omega-3 and omega-6, but there’s a perfect balance that you should strive to achieve. The ideal ratio is four units of omega-6 to one unit of omega-3. Today the average diet is 25 parts of omega-6 to one part omega-3. Omega-3 is good for anxiety and can help lift depression. It is good for eyesight, reduces the risk of heart disease, is anti-inflammatory, reduces the risk of diabetes, reduces the symptoms of ADHD, may help prevent cancer, improves bone health and can be helpful to prevent mental decline that occurs with age. Sources of Omega 3 are fatty fish such as fatty fish like herring, salmon and tuna, shrimp or flaxseeds and other seeds and nuts, particularly macadamia nuts.

Magnesium can help keep blood pressure lower.

If you lack magnesium, it could be the cause of your high blood pressure. Not only does a lack of magnesium cause an increase in blood pressure, it could also cause muscle cramps. Since the heart is a muscle, getting adequate magnesium is extremely important. Lack of magnesium is also related to mental disorders, irregular heartbeat, asthma and osteoporosis. What contains magnesium? Soybeans, raw spinach, avocados and dark chocolate are a few. If you soak your feet in Epsom’s salt, magnesium sulfate, it can ease muscle and joint pain.

  • Dietary fiber helps lower blood cholesterol levels, which helps prevent heart disease. It also helps you lose weight, which can also help promote heart health. Fresh fruit and vegetables provide fiber, as does whole grains.
  • Look to green veggies like broccoli, asparagus, Brussels sprouts and lentils for extra folic acid, vitamin B-9. It reduces homocysteine, which is an indicator that you lack nutrients and a precursor for heart attack and stroke. Having adequate folic acid can reduce the risk of stroke and heart disease by 20%.
  • If you lack CoQ10, you might have high blood pressure. Low levels of CoQ10 are also linked to heart failure. Eating red meat, sea food, nuts and seeds, soy chicken and organ meats can increase CoQ10 levels.
  • Make your plate a rainbow. The more colorful your plate, the more likely you’ll have all the nutrients and phytonutrients your heart requires. Each color contains different amounts of specific heart healthy nutrition.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Is Dairy Good For Your Gut?

Is Dairy Good For Your Gut?

We provide nutritional information at Revolution Fitness, because you need both a program of exercise and a nutritious diet to have a healthy lifestyle. While everyone seems to agree on whether greens and veggies are good for your health, there’s a lot of controversy over whether dairy is. One problem is digestive issues, which leads to the question whether dairy is good for your gut. A healthy microbiome, the bacteria of the gut, is important to your overall health.

Dairy comes in many forms.

When discussing dairy, it all depends on the type of dairy you’re discussing. There is raw milk, pasteurized milk, fermented dairy and low fat dairy. Some people are advocates of raw milk, which has shown to have some benefits. However, it also has some drawbacks, such as an increased risk for listeria, which has a high mortality rate and often found in raw milk. While you might think low fat milk is good, studies show that whole milk reduces the risk of heart disease, other studies show that reduced fat milk is healthier, but only if you don’t add sugar to improve the flavor of reduced fat.

Milk is a good source of nutrition.

You need adequate nutrition for a healthy gut. Vitamins B, C and D are important, as are magnesium, selenium and zinc. Milk contains all those nutrients. It has 18 of the 22 essential nutrients that are necessary for good health. Not only is it loaded with magnesium, selenium and zinc, it also has calcium, phosphorus and iron plus, vitamins A, B-12, B-6, E, K, niacin, riboflavin, folate and thiamin. It also h

Not everyone can enjoy milk and milk products.

If you get seriously gassy after drinking milk, get nauseous after eating ice cream or cramp up when consuming almost all milk products except yogurt, you might be lactose intolerant. Lactose is a sugar found in milk, which digests in the small intestine. If your body doesn’t create enough of the enzyme lactase, which triggers the digestion, it moves to the large intestine undigested and sits. Then it ferments, causing gas, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. Some people even get skin rashes or more frequent colds. The colds may come from acid reflux that’s caused by lactose intolerance.

  • One milk product that will boost gut health is yogurt. Whether you choose Greek yogurt or regular, it’s the bacteria in the yogurt that helps gut health. Make sure you get yogurt with live bacteria and no sugar.
  • While you might think of milk as a great source of calcium to boost bone health, the Nurses Health study showed that consumption might increase the potential for fracture by as much as 50%.
  • While some studies show that countries with low milk consumption also have low rates of osteoporosis, other studies showed milk improved bone and dental health.
  • When choosing milk and milk products, choose ones from grass fed cows. Studies show that cows that grazed gave milk that was higher in nutrients and healthy fat.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training


Does Choosing Organic Food Make A Difference?

Does Choosing Organic Food Make A Difference?

We’re bombarded by advertising information that isn’t always completely true, so it can make you wonder whether all the hype about organic food is legitimate or just another reason to charge more money. Exactly what does organic mean? If you’re talking about vegetables and fruits, grown with no pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modifications or ionizing radiation. Animals raised organically take no antibiotics or growth hormones and are often free-range, meaning they aren’t kept in a cage and allowed to graze on grass or in the case of chickens, eat bugs and other natural foods.

You’ll get more nutrients from organic food.

Factory farms that aren’t organic fertilize with the minerals nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, which reduces trace minerals and nutrients in the produce. Studies show that the overall nutritional content of food is lower than it was just fifty years ago. Other studies show that farmers who use a more environmentally conscious, organic way, have a higher content of nutrients, such as vitamin C and phytochemicals.

There are pesticides in some fruits and vegetables grown at non organic farms.

Every year, the EWG—EnvironmentalWorking Group puts out a study identifying pesticides on fruits and vegetables. They take samples to check for pesticides, before and after washing them, then put out the results of the study and two lists, “The Dirty Dozen” and “The Clean Fifteen.” Those on the Dirty Dozen list are high in pesticides, so you should opt for the organic alternative. Those on the Clean Fifteen list are safe whether you choose regular fruits and vegetables or their organic counterparts.

You’ll get benefits from buying organic poultry, meat, dairy and eggs.

While fewer and fewer farmers are using antibiotics and hormones when raising their livestock, it still happens. You’ll know you’re getting clean, antibiotic and hormone-free products if you opt for organic products. In addition to that, many organic animal products are free-range or grass-fed, which adds even more benefits. Grass-fed beef and dairy provide more Omega-3 fatty acids, which improve heart health. They also contain conjugated linoleic acid, a type of fat that lowers the risk of cancer and heart disease. Free range eggs have lower bad cholesterol and fat and an increased amount of vitamin A, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E.

  • Fruits and vegetables on the Dirty Dozen list include: strawberries, kale, spinach, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, tomatoes, celery, and potatoes, with hot and sweet peppers being added as one extra. They’re in order from the most contaminated to the least.
  • The Clean 15 include: avocados sweet corn, pineapples, onions, papayas, sweet frozen peas, eggplant, asparagus, cauliflower, cantaloupe, broccoli, mushrooms, cabbage, honeydew melon and kiwi.
  • Not only is organic farming a healthier option in many cases, it’s environmentally good. It uses practices that replenish the land and offers more humane treatment for farm animals.
  • Some produce on the Clean Fifteen list may be GMO. A small percentage of the sweet corn, summer squash and papaya use genetically modified seeds. If you choose organic you’ll avoid GMO food.

For more information, contact us today at Revolution Training